Category Archives: Language

“May Not Be Suitable For Children”: What Is Appropriate for Young Adult Fiction

goldshaft-advisory“May Not Be Suitable for Children” should be my pen name, plastered across every short story, poem, and novel I write. There arises a dilemma in writing young adult fiction for teens, even for older teens, in that you must purposefully censor the content, language, and context of the story. At the same time, you want to commit to a certain degree of realism in your portrayal of teenagers—they cuss, take drugs, and make poor decisions. But at one point can the pursuit of depicting something “real” cross the line into commercializing the controversial? While editing my novel The Heathens and Liars of Lickskillet County, these questions have plagued me.

Young Adult Lit in general has begun catering to younger teens, from ages 12 to 15, and with that comes a certain sacrifice of material. Violence becomes cleaner, romance becomes chaste, and the 14-year-old who might be a bundle of angry hormones speaks proper as a British butler. On the other hand, there exist plenty of YA novels that explore the dark and gritty. Thirteen Reasons Why explores the suicide of the protagonist’s sister. The Perks of Being a Wallflower highlight sexual abuse within the family and contain scenes about drug exploration. Probably one of the books that takes on the most criticism for dark material is Crank, which details a girl’s descent into meth addiction.

The controversy has already been much discussed in blogs and articles, asking whether YA is TOO DARK? Here are some opinions on that, but here too is my opinion.

The Article That Started the Debate

YA Fiction Is Too Dark

YA Fiction Saves Lives

Think of the Children!

YA Fiction Shows Teenagers As They Actually Are

As edits began on my novel The Heathens and Liars of Lickskillet County, I began to have these exact conversations with my editor and publisher. After we reviewed some of the scenes in question, I agreed—some of these existed purely for shock value, the I can’t believe they might do that moments. Some were clearly inappropriate, though others existed for very particular reasons.

I’ll give an example: one character in the novel struggles with abuse in her relationship. In the first draft, I merely hinted at this dynamic and in subsequent drafts I wanted to bring the conversation of partner abuse to the forefront. So I employed the Toni Morrison school of realism and left nothing to the imagination, which created a powerful though perhaps horrendous scene. Was the scene necessary to show the horrors of abuse or could have I implied my opinion in some other way? In the end, I removed that particular scene because I believed that the character could convey her unsettling experience more easily herself. I could explain why domestic abuse was a terrible thing without actually showing domestic abuse, therefore in some way glamorizing that sort of violence.

Other controversies arose, as well, such as certain sex scenes and the presence of drugs and especially the level of cursing that some characters undertook. This caused the book to lower the f-word count nearly 100 f-words, which you probably might not notice reading the book. I based this novel and some of the action and the idiosyncrasies of the book on my friends, and my friends in high school swore like sailors. Of course we were always talking about sex and crimes and what we going to do once we broke out of our hometown. That’s part of growing up.

The most important question to ask is, why are you writing? Is the scene, though controversial, serving a specific purpose? I want to write something entertaining but also something educational. You learn not just about science or the South or even about the inner workings of teenagers, but a little something about what it means to be human.

Lastly, another big question: who are you writing for? It took me a long time to come to terms with the fact that I’m writing young adult literature, but the stigma of writing for teenagers has begun to dissolve. I always wanted to write “literary fiction,” something serious, though you can write serious fiction for teenagers. After all, I was reading Melville and Fitzgerald and Dostovskey and Eggers as a teenager, and even now I’m barely removed from “teenager status.” Over the past few years, YA Lit has trended toward younger readers (12-15), but I wanted to write something for the almost New Adult. And I don’t mean the genre “New Adult,” which has been swamped solely by romantic fiction. I want to for those in-between, people like me. Maybe we’re not ready to read academic treatises yet and still crave the adventure of a teen lit book, though we also want something substantial in our fiction. We wanted to learn something about being human, want to better ourselves through the process of reading.

So, maybe The Heathens and Liars of Lickskillet County isn’t “suitable for children,” but I hope it’s suitable for you.

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Cistern, 5pm

Cornflower yellow tiedownload (5)

dangling from his shoulder as he

stretches onto his side in the Cistern’s shadow mosaic,

his crisp blazer folded beneath his white crown.

When I approach to ask

if he might sign a petition for everyone

to start loving one another, he lowers his book and

wordlessly draws a pen from his breast pocket, and leans

forward to grab the clipboard.

Skinny Dipping With Strangers: Poems from 827 Book Release Party

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A documentation of the night of the book release of “Skinny Dipping with Strangers.” Missed the show, want to watch it again, or were on the other side of the world? No worries, got you covered.

Skinny Dipping With Strangers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2iUuGY5ykQ

Triathlon for Beached Whales:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG5ZO2Ycv3E

Spirit of the Bear:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SdcOJ7A1RQ

Halitus:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWjBZtv6Asw

Sob Stories:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGqXi8FBxpU

Landmine:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1pKfZcaYPA

Lalochezia:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLC5k0lx4aU

Enjoy.

M.A.D. Studios Feature

Snapshot 7 (1-3-2014 5-53 PM)Met some great poets and reunited with old friends at last night’s show. We took a few photographs recently posted on the Facebook page. I personally left very satisfied with my performance, was glad to showcase a more mature performing style that’s evolved over the past year. Unfortunately, the camera had some glitches, but here’s the bit of video we did manage to retrieve, which shows two great performances of two poems that appear on “Perfect Nights.” And then there’s almost all of “Perfect Nights” as well.

Although I would have loved videos of other poems, this could not be. Perhaps this is a good opportunity to perform these again in the near future.

Enjoy!

 

“Fork,” by Derek Berry

A performance at the King Dusko open mic about speech therapy and the importance of having a voice. Written a lot of new poems, fortunately, that will soon flow forth on the mic. Check them out as well as my forthcoming chapbook entitled Skinny Dipping with Strangers.

Leave thoughts below or on Youtube video.

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“Lords of the Arts, Revived.”

Below is a video from King Dusko’s first open mic, co-hosted by Khalil Ali and myself. Though the first few lines of this poem are cut off, here is it shared. The first line: “For those who wish to pursue art professionally…” Click the link to listen.

Lords of the Arts, Revived

 

For more pictures or videos, visit: http://charlestonpoets.com/

King Dusko Open Mic Promotional

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“Perfect Nights” performed by Derek Berry

Created this video at the Water Front Park before a Monday Night Open Mic. Enjoy.

Perfect Nights

Warning: May Contain Metaphors

I write a sonnet: iambic Tupac.

A rocket rented: let’s skip the sweet talk.

In the space the clouds are not even there,

Nothing can echo: not even prayer.

 

Calculate life spans: TI-83.

Death could come for you: I just hope not me.

Got a collection of glass bottles here—

Stocking up all week; stocking up all year.

 

Graveyard shift Arby’s: Roast Beef Sandwich please?

Hide my soul in grease: hide my heart in cheese.

Equilibrium of a black-singed penny

Insignificant if I owned any.

 

Feral ain’t the truth; I don’t have no proof.

Structure breeds the breath of Creation’s death.

“Not a Romance Novel”

You say, you want nothing more than to kiss me,

and I say, please turn off your damned phone.

Don’t you realize you’re missing the stars?

They’re trying to make a conversation with us

with winks and twinkles and hazy introductions.

This isn’t a romance novel

and it’s not a rodeo either.

It’s just another night of breathing and

of panoramic speculations of the galaxy

and of summer.

“Starving”

We’re all hungry for something more

And not just enough jumbo-sized pizza

Or calorie-rich milkshake from McDonald’s

Or another side of cheese-and-bacon fries.

 

But instead for the light at the end of the tunnel

That was foreclosed in the recession,

for the fingertips that brush our hair back

When we fall asleep in the passenger’s seat,

and for the words no one ever says

That could disrupt the void of silence

Fill the aching pit our stomachs reveal

When we realize we want something else, something more.

They say the whole country’s obese,

So the question is:

For what are we so desperately starving?